Scientific Computing Department Seminars
06 Jun 2019
Yes
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No

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Y

Simone Meloni, University of Ferrara, Italy

Host: Alin M Elena, Computational Chemistry, SCD

 

Friday 5 July 2019 at 11:00-12:00

CR3 DL and via VC to CR02- R89 (S44) in RAL

Please join the seminar via Zoom, see instructions below

 

Lead-Halide Perovskites: theory and experiments to unveil a promising candidate for 3rd generation solar cells

 

Perovskite solar cells received great attention from the diverse research community as these devices exhibit a great potential to efficiently harness the solar energy, a clean, and abundant source of energy. The perovskite semiconductors exhibit the general formula (ABX3) where A is a monovalent cation (methylammonium (MA), formamidinium (FA), cesium (Cs)), B is a divalent cation (Pb2+, Sn2+) and X is a halide anion (Br-, Cl-, I-). By tailoring the chemical composition of perovskite structures, various optical and electronic properties, including absorption coefficient, photoluminescence quantum yield, and charge-carrier mobilities can be improved. Consequently, the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of PSCs has been improved dramatically from 3.8% to >24%, bringing PSCs closer to the large-scale deployment.

In this talk I will illustrate our recent findings about fundamental properties of hybrid organic/inorganic perovskites concerning the relation between composition/bandgap/frontier energy level, cation and halide mixing, the unusual dependence of the photoluminescence spectrum with temperature and the stability of these intriguing systems. I will show you how the combined experimental/theoretical work developed in collaboration with the group of Prof. Grätzel (EPFL) allowed us to address some key questions that helped progressing the development lead-halide perovskites for solar cells and optoelectronic applications.

 

 

JOIN BY ZOOM:

**Please turn off your camera and microphones once connected**

 

Join from PC, Mac, Linux, iOS or Android: https://ukri-stfc.zoom.us/j/466077137

 

You can test your connection prior to the meeting here:

https://ukri-stfc.zoom.us/test

 

Or iPhone one-tap :

    United Kingdom: +442039663809,,466077137#  or +441314601196,,466077137#

Or Telephone:

    Dial(for higher quality, dial a number based on your current location):

        United Kingdom: +44 203 966 3809  or +44 131 460 1196  or +44 203 051 2874  or +44 203 481 5237

        US: +1 646 876 9923  or +1 669 900 6833  or +1 408 638 0968

    Meeting ID: 466 077 137

    International numbers available: https://zoom.us/u/abzn04SnjE

 

Or an H.323/SIP room system:

    H.323:

        162.255.37.11 (US West)

        162.255.36.11 (US East)

        221.122.88.195 (China)

        115.114.131.7 (India)

        213.19.144.110 (EMEA)

        103.122.166.55 (Australia)

        209.9.211.110 (Hong Kong)

        64.211.144.160 (Brazil)

        69.174.57.160 (Canada)

        207.226.132.110 (Japan)

        202.177.207.158

    Meeting ID: 466 077 137

 

    SIP: 466077137@zoomcrc.com

 

Or Skype for Business (Lync):

    https://ukri-stfc.zoom.us/skype/466077137

 

Or Skype on a SurfaceHub:

    SIP: 466077137@lync.zoom.us

Y

 

ou are invited to an SCD seminar by –

Dr Shan Zhong, School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, The University of Manchester

Host: Jian Fang, SCD

Friday 28 June at 14:00-15:00

CR3 DL and via VC to R89/S48 in RAL

To join by Zoom see instructions below

 

PASSIVE FLOW CONTROL USING BIO-INSPIRED MICRO-SCALE SURFACE STRUCTURES

 

Herringbone riblets or convergent-divergent (C-D) riblets are a new type of surface patterns which begins to receive research attention in the recent years. They consist of sections of left-tilted and right-tilted micro grooves which are joined together side by side. Such micro patterns have been found on shark skins and on the secondary flight feathers of birds. Due to the directional orientation of these micro grooves, C-D riblets are capable of generating weak large-scale secondary flow motion across the boundary layer resulting in a significant modification of boundary layer characteristics in the spanwise direction.

 

In this seminar, Prof Shan Zhong will present the finding from a series of experimental studies undertaken at Manchester demonstrating the effectiveness of this type of bio-inspired riblets in reducing the pressure losses in linear cascades and attenuating shockwave-induced flow separation. She will also present the results from flat-plate boundary layers aiming to understand the impact of these riblets on boundary layer development and turbulent structures.

 

Brief Bio

Shan Zhong obtained her BEng and MEng degrees from Tsinghua University in China and her PhD degree from Cambridge University. She joined The University of Manchester as a Lecturer in 1997 after having worked as a postdoctoral research associate at Oxford University for three years. She is now Professor of Experimental Fluid Mechanics and the head of Aerodynamics Research Group at the School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering.

Prof Zhong’s research work spans a wide range of flow regimes from low-Reynolds number propulsion to supersonic flow.  Her main research area in the past 15 years is flow control with a focus on understanding the flow physics involved and maximising the flow control effectiveness for given applications. She has carried out extensive studies on synthetic jets for a range of applications including flow separation control, fluid mixing, heat transfer augmentation and surface friction reduction. In the recent years, she has switched her research interest to bio-inspired passive flow control technologies (such as leading edge tubercles and micro-scale surface patterns) and begun to explore their potential for improving the performance of various aerodynamic shapes. 

Prof Zhong is a Fellow of Royal Aeronautical Society and a senior life-time member of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronauti


You are invited to an SCD seminar by –

Dr Shan Zhong, School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, The University of Manchester

Host: Jian Fang, SCD

Friday 28 June at 14:00-15:00

CR3 DL and via VC to R89/S48 in RAL

To join by Zoom see instructions below

 

PASSIVE FLOW CONTROL USING BIO-INSPIRED MICRO-SCALE SURFACE STRUCTURES

 

Herringbone riblets or convergent-divergent (C-D) riblets are a new type of surface patterns which begins to receive research attention in the recent years. They consist of sections of left-tilted and right-tilted micro grooves which are joined together side by side. Such micro patterns have been found on shark skins and on the secondary flight feathers of birds. Due to the directional orientation of these micro grooves, C-D riblets are capable of generating weak large-scale secondary flow motion across the boundary layer resulting in a significant modification of boundary layer characteristics in the spanwise direction.

 

In this seminar, Prof Shan Zhong will present the finding from a series of experimental studies undertaken at Manchester demonstrating the effectiveness of this type of bio-inspired riblets in reducing the pressure losses in linear cascades and attenuating shockwave-induced flow separation. She will also present the results from flat-plate boundary layers aiming to understand the impact of these riblets on boundary layer development and turbulent structures.

 

Brief Bio

Shan Zhong obtained her BEng and MEng degrees from Tsinghua University in China and her PhD degree from Cambridge University. She joined The University of Manchester as a Lecturer in 1997 after having worked as a postdoctoral research associate at Oxford University for three years. She is now Professor of Experimental Fluid Mechanics and the head of Aerodynamics Research Group at the School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering.

Prof Zhong’s research work spans a wide range of flow regimes from low-Reynolds number propulsion to supersonic flow.  Her main research area in the past 15 years is flow control with a focus on understanding the flow physics involved and maximising the flow control effectiveness for given applications. She has carried out extensive studies on synthetic jets for a range of applications including flow separation control, fluid mixing, heat transfer augmentation and surface friction reduction. In the recent years, she has switched her research interest to bio-inspired passive flow control technologies (such as leading edge tubercles and micro-scale surface patterns) and begun to explore their potential for improving the performance of various aerodynamic shapes. 

Prof Zhong is a Fellow of Royal Aeronautical Society and a senior life-time member of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics.


 gooyiy
                       
 
       Sergei Kalinin, Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Host: Jerome Jackson, Theoretical and Computational Physics, SCD

 

Thursday 4 July at 15:15-16:15

Walton Room DL and via VC to R89/S48 in RAL

To join by Zoom see instructions below

 

 

Deep Neural Networks in Electron Microscopy of Quantum Materials: From Learning Physics to Atomic Manipulation

 

Sergei V. Kalinin

The Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences and the Institute for Functional Imaging of Materials, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831

 

Atomically-resolved imaging of materials has become the mainstay of modern materials science, as enabled by advent of aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). However, the wealth of quantitative information contained in the fine details of atomic structure or spectra remains largely unexplored. In this talk, I will present the new opportunities enabled by physics-informed big data and machine learning technologies to extract physical information from static and dynamic STEM images. The deep learning models trained on theoretically simulated images or labeled library data demonstrate extremely high efficiency in extracting atomic coordinates and trajectories, converting massive volumes of statistical and dynamic data into structural descriptors. I further present a method to take advantage of atomic-scale observations of chemical and structural fluctuations and use them to build a generative model (including near-neighbor interactions) that can be used to predict the phase diagram of the system in a finite temperature and composition space. Similar approach is applied to probe the kinetics of solid-state reactions on a single defect level and defect formation in solids via atomic-scale observations. Finally, synergy of deep learning image analytics and real-time feedback further allows harnessing beam-induced atomic and bond dynamics to enable direct atom-by-atom fabrication. Examples of direct atomic motion over mesoscopic distances, engineered doping at selected lattice site, and assembly of multiatomic structures will be demonstrated. These advances position STEM towards transition from purely imaging tool for atomic-scale laboratory of electronic, phonon, and quantum phenomena in atomically-engineered structures.

This research was sponsored by the Division of Basic Energy Sciences, BES, DOE, and was conducted at the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences, sponsored at Oak Ridge National Laboratory by the Scientific User Facilities Division.

 

 

JOIN BY ZOOM:

**Please turn off your camera and microphones once connected**

 

Join from PC, Mac, Linux, iOS or Android: https://ukri-stfc.zoom.us/j/359492516

 

You can test your connection prior to the meeting here:

https://ukri-stfc.zoom.us/test

 

Or iPhone one-tap :

   United Kingdom: +441314601196,,359492516#  or +442030512874,,359492516#

Or Telephone:

    Dial(for higher quality, dial a number based on your current location):

        United Kingdom: +44 131 460 1196  or +44 203 051 2874  or +44 203 481 5237  or +44 203 966 3809

        US: +1 646 876 9923  or +1 669 900 6833  or +1 408 638 0968

    Meeting ID: 359 492 516

    International numbers available: https://zoom.us/u/abzn04SnjE

 

Or an H.323/SIP room system:

    H.323:

        162.255.37.11 (US West)

        162.255.36.11 (US East)

        221.122.88.195 (China)

        115.114.131.7 (India)

        213.19.144.110 (EMEA)

        103.122.166.55 (Australia)

        209.9.211.110 (Hong Kong)

        64.211.144.160 (Brazil)

        69.174.57.160 (Canada)

        207.226.132.110 (Japan)

        202.177.207.158

    Meeting ID: 359 492 516

 

    SIP: 359492516@zoomcrc.com

 

Or Skype for Business (Lync):

    https://ukri-stfc.zoom.us/skype/359492516

 

Or Skype on a SurfaceHub:

    SIP: 359492516@lync.zoom.us

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 SCROLL DOWN FOR MORE SCD SEMINARS

 

 

 

Simone Meloni, University of Ferrara, Italy

Host: Alin M Elena, Computational Chemistry, SCD

 

Friday 5 July 2019 at 11:00-12:00

CR3 DL and via VC to CR02- R89 (S44) in RAL

Please join the seminar via Zoom, see instructions below

 

Lead-Halide Perovskites: theory and experiments to unveil a promising candidate for 3rd generation solar cells

 

Perovskite solar cells received great attention from the diverse research community as these devices exhibit a great potential to efficiently harness the solar energy, a clean, and abundant source of energy. The perovskite semiconductors exhibit the general formula (ABX3) where A is a monovalent cation (methylammonium (MA), formamidinium (FA), cesium (Cs)), B is a divalent cation (Pb2+, Sn2+) and X is a halide anion (Br-, Cl-, I-). By tailoring the chemical composition of perovskite structures, various optical and electronic properties, including absorption coefficient, photoluminescence quantum yield, and charge-carrier mobilities can be improved. Consequently, the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of PSCs has been improved dramatically from 3.8% to >24%, bringing PSCs closer to the large-scale deployment.

In this talk I will illustrate our recent findings about fundamental properties of hybrid organic/inorganic perovskites concerning the relation between composition/bandgap/frontier energy level, cation and halide mixing, the unusual dependence of the photoluminescence spectrum with temperature and the stability of these intriguing systems. I will show you how the combined experimental/theoretical work developed in collaboration with the group of Prof. Grätzel (EPFL) allowed us to address some key questions that helped progressing the development lead-halide perovskites for solar cells and optoelectronic applications.

 

 

JOIN BY ZOOM:

**Please turn off your camera and microphones once connected**

 

Join from PC, Mac, Linux, iOS or Android: https://ukri-stfc.zoom.us/j/466077137

 

You can test your connection prior to the meeting here:

https://ukri-stfc.zoom.us/test

 

Or iPhone one-tap :

    United Kingdom: +442039663809,,466077137#  or +441314601196,,466077137#

Or Telephone:

    Dial(for higher quality, dial a number based on your current location):

        United Kingdom: +44 203 966 3809  or +44 131 460 1196  or +44 203 051 2874  or +44 203 481 5237

        US: +1 646 876 9923  or +1 669 900 6833  or +1 408 638 0968

    Meeting ID: 466 077 137

 

ou are invited to an SCD seminar by –

Dr Shan Zhong, School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, The University of Manchester

Host: Jian Fang, SCD

Friday 28 June at 14:00-15:00

CR3 DL and via VC to R89/S48 in RAL

To join by Zoom see instructions below

 

PASSIVE FLOW CONTROL USING BIO-INSPIRED MICRO-SCALE SURFACE STRUCTURES

 

Herringbone riblets or convergent-divergent (C-D) riblets are a new type of surface patterns which begins to receive research attention in the recent years. They consist of sections of left-tilted and right-tilted micro grooves which are joined together side by side. Such micro patterns have been found on shark skins and on the secondary flight feathers of birds. Due to the directional orientation of these micro grooves, C-D riblets are capable of generating weak large-scale secondary flow motion across the boundary layer resulting in a significant modification of boundary layer characteristics in the spanwise direction.

 

In this seminar, Prof Shan Zhong will present the finding from a series of experimental studies undertaken at Manchester demonstrating the effectiveness of this type of bio-inspired riblets in reducing the pressure losses in linear cascades and attenuating shockwave-induced flow separation. She will also present the results from flat-plate boundary layers aiming to understand the impact of these riblets on boundary layer development and turbulent structures.

 

Brief Bio

Shan Zhong obtained her BEng and MEng degrees from Tsinghua University in China and her PhD degree from Cambridge University. She joined The University of Manchester as a Lecturer in 1997 after having worked as a postdoctoral research associate at Oxford University for three years. She is now Professor of Experimental Fluid Mechanics and the head of Aerodynamics Research Group at the School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering.

Prof Zhong’s research work spans a wide range of flow regimes from low-Reynolds number propulsion to supersonic flow.  Her main research area in the past 15 years is flow control with a focus on understanding the flow physics involved and maximising the flow control effectiveness for given applications. She has carried out extensive studies on synthetic jets for a range of applications including flow separation control, fluid mixing, heat transfer augmentation and surface friction reduction. In the recent years, she has switched her research interest to bio-inspired passive flow control technologies (such as leading edge tubercles and micro-scale surface patterns) and begun to explore their potential for improving the performance of various aerodynamic shapes. 

Prof Zhong is a Fellow of Royal Aeronautical Society and a senior life-time member of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronauti

You are invited to an SCD seminar by –

Dr Shan Zhong, School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, The University of Manchester

Host: Jian Fang, SCD

Friday 28 June at 14:00-15:00

CR3 DL and via VC to R89/S48 in RAL

To join by Zoom see instructions below

 

PASSIVE FLOW CONTROL USING BIO-INSPIRED MICRO-SCALE SURFACE STRUCTURES

 

Herringbone riblets or convergent-divergent (C-D) riblets are a new type of surface patterns which begins to receive research attention in the recent years. They consist of sections of left-tilted and right-tilted micro grooves which are joined together side by side. Such micro patterns have been found on shark skins and on the secondary flight feathers of birds. Due to the directional orientation of these micro grooves, C-D riblets are capable of generating weak large-scale secondary flow motion across the boundary layer resulting in a significant modification of boundary layer characteristics in the spanwise direction.

 

In this seminar, Prof Shan Zhong will present the finding from a series of experimental studies undertaken at Manchester demonstrating the effectiveness of this type of bio-inspired riblets in reducing the pressure losses in linear cascades and attenuating shockwave-induced flow separation. She will also present the results from flat-plate boundary layers aiming to understand the impact of these riblets on boundary layer development and turbulent structures.

 

Brief Bio

Shan Zhong obtained her BEng and MEng degrees from Tsinghua University in China and her PhD degree from Cambridge University. She joined The University of Manchester as a Lecturer in 1997 after having worked as a postdoctoral research associate at Oxford University for three years. She is now Professor of Experimental Fluid Mechanics and the head of Aerodynamics Research Group at the School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering.

Prof Zhong’s research work spans a wide range of flow regimes from low-Reynolds number propulsion to supersonic flow.  Her main research area in the past 15 years is flow control with a focus on understanding the flow physics involved and maximising the flow control effectiveness for given applications. She has carried out extensive studies on synthetic jets for a range of applications including flow separation control, fluid mixing, heat transfer augmentation and surface friction reduction. In the recent years, she has switched her research interest to bio-inspired passive flow control technologies (such as leading edge tubercles and micro-scale surface patterns) and begun to explore their potential for improving the performance of various aerodynamic shapes. 

Prof Zhong is a Fellow of Royal Aeronautical Society and a senior life-time member of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics.

 gooyiy

 


 

Contact: Lomas, Georgia (STFC,DL,SC)